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All Aspects of ROCK & JAZZ

A music resource website, for rock, jazz and classical musicians: Free note writing software and much more.

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Chord Dictionary 1

Standard Chords. 3

Extended Chords, 7. 4

Extended Chords, 9. 5

Extended Chords, 11. 6

Extended Chords, (b5), (+/#5), dim and sus. 7

MOVABLE Chords, ADVANCED JAZZ. 8

The Barre Chord. 8

The Capo (Capodastro) 9

Guitar Links 9

 

 

Chord Dictionary

The classical way of representing the chords in a simple graphic form is the chord box. This tool, used since the early 1920’ies, is closely related to the Tablature, but opposite to the dynamic note-like form of the tablature, the chord box is static. The following tables show examples of how to produce a chord in different positions on the fretboard. There are two main types of chord boxes, the open chords and the movable chords. The latter is the most common in rock and jazz, while the open chords (except for the golden chords) mostly belong to folk music and classical guitar music. The chords are grouped into Standard, Extended, Neutral and Advanced chords.

 

NOTE Chords marked with golden background are classic open chords.
The golden chords
should be learned by heart before you learn any other chord forms!!!

 

 

Ask the Professor!

 

Q: What is a Chord Box???

A: The Chord Box is a schematic drawing of the strings and frets, where the placing of the fingers is marked with black circles.

 

 

Fret Number In case of movable chords, the basic fret number is shown to the left of the chord box.

 

1 Finger markers

2 Fret 0 = open chord

3 Open string

4 Muted string

5 Barre

6 Mini barre

 


Standard Chords

Scale

Major

Minor

6

7

9

C

C#/Db

D

D#/Eb

E

F

F#/Gb

G

G#/Ab

A

A#/Bb

B

 

Extended Chords, 7

Scale

maj7

m7

m(maj7)

m7(b5)

m7+9

C

C#/Db

D

D#/Eb

E

F

F#/Gb

G

G#/Ab

A

A#/Bb

B

 


Extended Chords, 9

Scale

maj9

m9

(add 9)

7(b9) / -9

7(b9) / -10

C

C#/Db

D

D#/Eb

E

F

F#/Gb

G

G#/Ab

A

A#/Bb

B

 


Extended Chords, 11

Scale

11

7(#11)

m11

C

C#/Db

D

D#/Eb

E

F

F#/Gb

G

G#/Ab

A

A#/Bb

B

 


Extended Chords, (b5), (+/#5), dim and sus

Scale

(b5)

+ / #5

dim

sus4

C

C#/Db

D

D#/Eb

E

F

F#/Gb

G

G#/Ab

A

A#/Bb

B

 


MOVABLE Chords, ADVANCED JAZZ

7 Variations

7(#5/b9)

7(#5/#9)

7(b5/b9)

7(b5/#9)

maj7 Variation

maj7(#11)

13 Chords

13

13

13(#11)

m13

 

 

This was only the beginning!

 

These chord boxes are excerpts from All Aspects of ROCK & JAZZ/ 3 Guitar (Pro). They are only a few examples of the thousands of possible chord variations. But the examples actually provide you with a whole range of classical open chords and several movable forms, which can be used and varied endlessly. On the WEB and in your music store, you can find many advanced books, with for example different tunings and modal chords. So you see – this was only an appetizer!

 

 

The Barre Chord

       The principles of movable chords Folk music guitarists play with open string chords most of the time. When the folk guitarist has to play in a strange anti-guitar key like Eb or Bb, the poor guy needs to change the fret base to another starting point. An ancient device called the capo (see the later section) does the trick mechanically. But what about the poor rock and jazz players? We use a finger instead! By covering all six strings with the 1st finger on one of the frets, you have three fingers left to reconstruct many of the open chords only in another key. The classic barre fingering covers all the strings, but small 2, 3 or 4 string barre fingerings are also used to compensate for the lack of 6-7 fingers! With the barre fingering, you are able to play in all keys on an instrument born in the E, A, G and D keys.


       Base Chords All barre chords are intimately connected to the open chords they simulate. The barre chords can be classified according to “base” chords like this:

       -      Base E and Base A are the standard barre bases. They include both major, minor and various extended chord forms.

       -      Other barre bases could be Base D, Base C or Base G, but the C and G bases are not normal in rock. Base D is maybe new to even advanced rock players, although it is used in jazz playing. So why not try the D major, minor and 7 chord, and listen to the new interesting sounds of your guitar!

The Capo (Capodastro)

       Cheating the Guitar If you play a semi acoustic guitar without distortion, you may use the Capo to change keys, especially if you work with complicated open chords. Here are the high tech and classic versions of the artificial finger!

 

 

 

High-tech Kyser Quick Capo

Classic Quick Capo

 

Guitar Links

A few links (for some reasons, our Guitar Tutor has no guitar links L ). If you check out the bass links, though, you will find a number of links with both guitar and bass lessons and tips.

 

http://www.torvund.net/guitar/LessonWeek/index.asp

Norwegian blues guitarist with a number of classic blues lessons.

 

http://www.guitar4ever.net/

Guitar tablature site including in depth descriptions of guitar techniques and practical tips.

 

http://www.hotfrets.com/

Nice forum with guitar lessons, automatic tablature, smart chord finder and a number of very useful tools. The guitar lessons are short but to the point.

 

http://www.guitarmasterclass.net/

Swedish guitar site with some really nice free lessons in a very relaxed Scandinavian atmosphere Kris Dahl runs the site; He’s a great player and a good teacher.